Posted: 16 February 2009 22:29

Bexhill had 30 widely dispersed roadblocks, which is why it's taken me three trips so far. Today's excursion polished off 8 of the outstanding 12 locations.

Roadblock recce

First stop was in Sidley, on the outskirts of Bexhill, where this line of five cylinders marks the corner of a garage forecourt; I mentioned this group back in January 2007 including a photo taken from the opposite direction.

The roadbock from which these cylinders came is unusual in that there were 32 listed, but the officer compiling the Roadblock report gives 30 as the number required; I've not seen a surplus listed elsewhere (yet), but I can only assume another block was bolstered by the extra pair.

These cylinders have a curious domed top and no central hole to assist with moving them; this variant appears peculiar to the Bexhill area; the only other example I know is also in Bexhill.

Surface shelter

I made several stops on the outskirts of Bexhill, finding no further evidence of roadblocks.

I did, however, find this nice example of a public surface air raid shelter dug into the roadside bank in Upper Sea Road. Not surprisingly, the two entrances are blocked, opening directly onto a busy road.

Although a nearby roadblock no longer survived, it was good to see this particular piece of wartime architecture.

- Pete

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Cylinders

Reinforced concrete cylindrical obstacles with a shaft down the centre in which could be inserted a crowbar for manhandling, or a picket for barbed wire. Cylinders were 90cm high and 60cm wide and deployed in groups of three as a more effective alternative for buoys.



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Hibbs, Peter Roadblock recce (19) Bexhill (2017) Available at: http://pillbox.org.uk/blog/216605/ Accessed: 22 September 2017

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